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The Secret Meaning Behind Every Apple Event Name Since 2001 – Review Geek

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Danny has been a technology journalist since 2008. He served as senior writer, as well as multimedia and home improvement editor at Top Ten Reviews until 2019. Since then, he has been a freelance contributor to Lifewire and ghostwriter for Fit Small Business. His work has also appeared on Laptop Mag, Tom’s Guide, and business.com. Read more…
Steve Jobs set the standard for product announcements in Apple Events. His keynote appearances became so popular that fans dubbed his speeches “Steve Notes.” Now, it’s a tradition for Apple to send colorful invitations to the press members for upcoming events, with a tagline teasing what’s to come.
These little hints are often obvious, occasionally vague, and sometimes there’s no discernible meaning to them at all. And Apple never comes out and says, “This is what we meant in our clever tagline.” So, it’s left for us to figure out what the clues meant after the fact.
We’ve gathered all the taglines from Apple Events since 2005 to show you what the clues were, what products were announced, and try to explain what Apple probably meant by them.

2001
    October 23: ‘Hint: It’s not a Mac’
2005
    September 7: ‘1000 songs in your pocket changed everything. Here we go again’
    October 12: ‘One more thing…’
    October 19: ‘We unveil Apple’s latest pro innovations.’
2006
    February 28: ‘Come see some fun new products from Apple’
    September 12: ‘It’s Showtime’
2007
    January 9: ‘The first 30 years were the just the beginning’
    April 15: ‘Lights Camera Apple’
    September 5: ‘The Beat Goes On’
2008
    September 9: ‘Let’s Rock’
    October 14: ‘The spotlight turns to notebooks’
2009
    September 9: ‘It’s only rock and roll, but we like it.’
2010
    January 27: ‘Come see our latest creation.’
    April 8: ‘Get a sneak peek into the features of iPhone OS 4.0’
    September 1:  No tagline in the invitation, just a guitar.
    October 20: ‘Back to the Mac’
2011
    March 2: ‘Come see what 2011 will be the year of’
    October 4: ‘Let’s talk iPhone’
2012
    September 12: ‘It’s almost here.’
    October 23: ‘We’ve got a little more to show you.’
2013
    September 10: ‘This should brighten everyone’s day.’
    October 22: ‘We still have a lot to cover.’
2014
    September 9: ‘Wish we could say more.’
    October 16: ‘It’s been way too long.’
2015
    March 9: ‘Spring Forward’
    September 9: ‘Hey Siri, give us a hint’
2016
    March 21: ‘Let us loop you in.’
    September 7: ‘See you on the 7th.’
    October 27: ‘hello again’
2017
    September 12: ‘Let’s meet at our place’
2018
    March 27: ‘Let’s take a field trip.’
    September 12: ‘Gather round.’
    October 30: ‘There’s more in the making.’
2019
    March 25: ‘It’s show time.’
    September 10: ‘By innovation only.’
2020
    September 15: ‘Time flies.’
    October 13: ‘Hi, Speed.’
    November 10: ‘One more thing.’
2021
    April 20: ‘Spring Loaded.’
    September 14: ‘California streaming’
    October 18: ‘Unleashed’
2022
    March 8: ‘Peek performance’

While the tagline tradition started in earnest in 2005, we would be remiss if we didn’t mention one of the most famous Apple events in history: the introduction of the iPod. This device, more than any other, set the stage for what Apple would do in the second Jobs era.
The tagline “Hint: It’s Not a Mac” seems (at least in retrospect) to be an obvious signal that the company would venture into previously unexplored territory.
What was announced:
Apple’s marketing campaign for the iPod included the slogan “1000 songs in your pocket.” The direct tie to the 2001 tagline indicated that a significant innovation in iPod technology was on the way.
What was announced:
In Apple vernacular, “One more thing” is the final segment of a keynote. In the context of this Apple invite, it could just be a nod to the catchphrase itself. But when you see that the announcements included the iPod Video (later the iPod Classic), you could read it to mean “Here’s one more iPod” since the previous Apple Event was also iPod-related.
What was announced:
This one is one of the obvious ones. Apple showed off its high-end line of computers aimed at professionals. This event saw the last announcement of the Apple PowerBook before the company discontinued it the following year.
What was announced:
There’s not a lot of nuance in this invitation tagline. This event saw some upgrades to existing product lines.
What was announced:
The “Showtime” reference appears to be a tease at Apple TV. And if you followed Apple news and rumors, it was an easy guess even at the time.
What was announced:
While the iPhone was a massive game-changer in the communications and computing worlds, it wasn’t a huge shock when Steve Jobs introduced it. Reports and rumors of an Apple smartphone had been circulating for years. Everyone knew it would be significant and continue Apple’s trajectory as an industry trendsetter. And this tagline perfectly reflects that.
What was announced:
In a lighthearted take on the “Lights, camera, action” from film production, this Apple event focused on their media production software, Final Cut. Now one of the industry standard editing programs in Hollywood and worldwide.
What was announced:
Apple’s takeover of the music industry through iTunes, the iTunes Store, and the iPod redefined the company in many ways. The company often uses song-themed taglines when announcing music-related products. In this case, the hint alludes to “The Beat Goes On” by Sonny & Cher.
What was announced:
“Let’s Rock” obviously refers to another music-themed event. However, it’s unclear if Apple was calling out a specific song, but probably not.
What was announced:
In this invitation, Apple seems to acknowledge that its beloved laptop lines needed some attention.
What was announced:
Another music-themed invite for an iPod-heavy event. The tagline plays on The Rolling Stones’ 1974 song “It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It).”
What was announced:
Like the iPhone before it, nobody was shocked to see the unveiling of the iPad. Speculation, rumor, and leaks were common for what people then called the “Apple Tablet.” The tagline was a seeming admission that Apple understood everybody knew what was coming. But, they were astounded anyway.
What was announced:
This tagline isn’t even a hint. It just tells you what to expect.
What was announced:
The lack of a tagline in this invite hits that Apple wanted you to focus on the image of the guitar with a sound hole in the shape of the company’s logo, indicating a music-themed announcement.
What was announced:
This hint is easy. A Mac-themed event that saw the App Store come to your desktop.
What was announced:
Apple doesn’t give significant clues about what it will present in this event invitation.
What was announced:
It’s pretty clear what Apple wants to talk about.
What was announced:
“See” and “touch” in this tagline refer to watching television with Apple TV (seeing) and using the new iPad’s touch screen (touch).
What was announced:
This hint is quite vague, and it’s probably just hype language. All of the announcements were continuing generations of existing product lines.
What was announced:
Another tagline doesn’t give clues as to what will be presented at the event. It’s most likely a call to the fact that it hadn’t been long since the last announcement.
What was announced:
The “bright” reference most likely ties to the announcement of the iPhone 5c, a budget-friendly smartphone that came in several bright colors.
What was announced:
Like in 2012, Apple held this event less than six weeks before the last one, and this tagline is a signal that they’re still not done showing off their 2013 product lines.
What was announced:
Usually, when Apple announces a whole new product category, they drop at least some subtle hints. This invitation was the company’s way of saying, “We’re not gonna tell you nothin’.”
What was announced:
Yet another tagline doesn’t say anything about the products to be announced. It could be for the third year running that Apple is ribbing the press by joking, “Hey, didn’t we just see each other the other day?”.
What was announced:
As time passes, the press invitations become less about what will actually be announced at the event. This tagline seems to allude to the event occurring one day after the Daylight Saving Time shift in the United States when people set their clocks one hour ahead.
What was announced:
If you ask Siri this question, she’ll reply, “You can’t hurry news. No, you’ll just have to wait,” and gives you a link to the Apple Event webpage. Yes, it still works. Try for yourself.
What was announced:
The “loop” in this tagline is probably on the Apple Watch Bands that the company launched at this event.
What was announced:
Subtlety wasn’t a priority with this pun on the iPhone 7 being announced on the seventh day of the month.
What was announced:
“Hello, again” calls back to Steve Jobs’s first introduction of the Macintosh in 1984. Upon unveiling the machine, Steve said he would let Macintosh speak for itself. The computer’s first words were, “Hello, I’m Macintosh.” The “hello” imagery has been with the Mac ever since. So, it’s not surprising that this was a Macintosh-focused event.
What was announced:
This event was the first in the newly constructed Steve Jobs Theater. The tagline is a pretty clear nod to the building named in honor of the company’s legendary founder.
What was announced:
Continuing with location-themed event names, the field trip mentioned here was to Technical College Prep High School in Chicago. It was an education-centric event.
What was announced:
If there are any special hints to the iPhone, Apple Watch, or iOS, they’re hidden quite deep. This tagline is likely a simple call for the press to show up and listen to what Tim Cook had to say.
What was announced:
This invitation doesn’t seem to contain a hint. But given that Apple wasn’t introducing anything new, merely continuing on their popular product lines. But it could also be interpreted to mean, “It’s only been six weeks, but we’ve got some more cool stuff to show you.”
What was announced:
Recycling old favorites becomes inevitable at some point. This hint is a callback to the 2006 event that introduced Apple TV. So, not surprising when it turned out to be an Apple TV announcement in the mix.
What was announced:
There is no apparent connection between the text on this invitation and the products announced at the event.
What was announced:
The time reference is a nod to the announcement of the Apple Watch SE.
What was announced:
“Speed” in the tagline is a call out to the increased support for 5G wireless networks in the iPhone 12.
What was announced:
In another hint that plays the hits, this tagline probably highlights the fact that it had only been a little over a month since the last Apple Event.
What was announced:
Unfortunately, this tagline appears to cite the time of year the Apple Event was held. The AirTags probably deserved to get a pun on their entry into the world.
What was announced:
In a return to music references, this event tagline is a play on The Mamas & the Papas “California Dreamin‘” to acknowledge that this Apple Event would be held virtually due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
What was announced:
This one-word declaration could apply to almost anything. But, in this case, it was to unleash the power of the new M1 MacBook Pro.
What was announced:
In this grammar-bending event name, Apple singled that it would give journalists a glimpse into their most high-performing devices yet.
What was announced:
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Nitika is a MCA graduate and works as all-round news writer at The Hoops News. In free time, she works on Photoshop and plays GTA V on her Xbox. A tech-enthusiast at heart, she explores ways that businesses can leverage the Internet and move their businesses to the next level. You can contact her at nitika@thehoopsnews.com.