Home Latest Russia-Ukraine war: Ukraine capturing villages near Kherson, says US; IAEA calls for...

Russia-Ukraine war: Ukraine capturing villages near Kherson, says US; IAEA calls for security zone at Zaporizhzhia – as it happened – The Guardian

Admiral Sir Tony Radakin says conflict nonetheless expected to ‘grind on for a long time’
Vladimir Putin is “failing on all of his military strategic objectives”, the chief of the defence staff has said.
Adm Sir Tony Radakin said the conflict is likely to “grind on for a long time”, despite recent successes by Ukrainian military forces.
Asked about the situation in Ukraine, he told the BBC’s Sunday With Laura Kuenssberg programme:
.css-knbk2a{height:1em;width:1.5em;margin-right:3px;vertical-align:baseline;fill:#C70000;}At the very outset, we said that this was a strategic error by President Putin and strategic errors lead to strategic consequences.
And in this instance, it’s strategic failure. Putin is failing on all of his military strategic objectives. He wanted to subjugate Ukraine, that’s not going to happen.
He wanted to take control of the capital, we saw that that was defeated earlier on. We saw that he wanted to weaken Nato. Nato is now much stronger, and we have Finland and Sweden joining.
He wants to break the international resolve. Well, actually that strengthened over this period, and he’s under pressure, his problems are mounting.
He added:
.css-knbk2a{height:1em;width:1.5em;margin-right:3px;vertical-align:baseline;fill:#C70000;}He’s always had a problem in terms of crewing the equipment that he’s got. He hasn’t got sufficient manpower. His forces are thin on the ground. And we’re also seeing a magnificent Ukrainian armed forces who have been courageous, they’re fighting for their country, and they’ve embraced the international support that all of us are providing.
"At a strategic level this is a failure for Putin"

Chief of the Defence Staff Admiral Sir Tony Radakin says Russia's problems are "mounting" in Ukraine but the "likely result is it's going to grind on for a long time"#BBCLauraK https://t.co/p2GNG2dHv6 pic.twitter.com/xvmZcojNQE
Our colleague Josh Butler reports:
Australia won’t ban Russian tourists from entering the country as requested by Ukraine’s ambassador but is “assessing” whether to reopen the Australian embassy in Kyiv.
The acting prime minister, Richard Marles, also said on Sunday that Australia was considering sending further military aid to Ukraine to bolster existing commitments.
“We do need to be preparing ourselves for protracted conflict and on that basis, we get that we are going to need to provide support for Ukraine over the long term,” Marles told the ABC’s Insiders program.
Read more here: Australia won’t ban Russian tourists but is considering reopening embassy in Kyiv
These are some of the latest images to be sent to us over the newswires from Ukraine.
The BBC’s James Waterhouse has shared a video on Twitter of the final ovation, at the Kyiv Opera House, for ballet dancer Oleksandr Shapoval. He had performed for 28 seasons before volunteering to fight in the east. Waterhouse points out: “While Ukraine enjoys successes on the battlefield, his death is a reminder of the enduring, awful cost of this war.”
A final ovation for ballet dancer Oleksandr Shapoval at the Kyiv Opera House.

He’d performed for 28 seasons before volunteering to fight in the east.

While Ukraine enjoys successes on the battlefield, his death is a reminder of the enduring, awful cost of this war. pic.twitter.com/6V1m2vVFlr
Associated Press is reporting that Russian shelling hit cities and towns across a wide stretch of Ukraine during the night. The British Ministry of Defence has warned that Russia is likely to increase its attacks on civilian targets as it suffers battlefield defeats.
Russian shelling hit cities and towns across a wide stretch of Ukraine during the night, officials say. The British Defense Ministry has warned that Russia is likely to increase its attacks on civilian targets as it suffers battlefield defeats. https://t.co/pzV7l6REXS
Russia and Ukraine have accused each other of provoking fighting in Kherson after a video showed clashes in the centre of the occupied Ukrainian city on Saturday evening.
The Ukrainian army is leading a counter-offensive to retake the southern city, which was seized by the Russian army in the first weeks of the invasion.
Russian official media Vesti-Crimea broadcast a video on Saturday evening showing an exchange of fire around two armoured vehicles near Kherson train station.
The Russian-installed administration of Kherson said later in the day it had “destroyed” a group of attackers.
“There was a clash in the centre of Kherson between sections of the Russian armed forces patrolling the streets of the city and an unidentified group of people,” the administration said on Telegram.
On Sunday morning, the Ukrainian southern army command spokeswoman Natalia Gumeniuk said: “Yesterday’s shootings and explosions in Kherson are provocations by the occupiers.”
The Ukrainian presidential aide Mykhaylo Podolyak blamed the shootings on “growing tensions” between different pro-Moscow factions preparing to flee amid news of the Ukrainian army’s advances.
Kirill Stremousov, a pro-Moscow official in Kherson, said the city was “calm” on Sunday morning.
Kyiv was “trying to attack but without any results”, he said.
“We won’t say that everything is smooth and there is no problem in the Kherson region … [but] everything will be fine.”
There have been a series of targeted attacks against pro-Russian officials in Kherson and in other occupied areas in recent weeks.

In Diary of an Invasion, the Ukrainian novelist Andrey Kurkov has documented Russia’s attack on his homeland. This morning, the Observer published extracts in which Kurkov recounts the first weeks of the conflict.
“You have to get used psychologically to the idea that war has begun. Because from that moment on, war determines your way of life, your way of thinking, your way of making decisions.”
Jack Watling, a senior research fellow for land warfare at the Royal United Services Institute, writes for us that Russia’s underperforming military capability may be key to its downfall:
Viewed purely in terms of the size of their formations and equipment, Russian ground forces in Ukraine still pose a serious threat on a number of axes.
In practice, however, it is highly unlikely the Russian military can recover from its increasingly terminal trajectory on the battlefield, though its defeat will take time and bitter fighting. To understand why, it is necessary to examine the force beyond its equipment and personnel.
The US assesses military capability through the abbreviation DOTMLPF. That senior US officers regularly try to roll this off the tongue as an acronym may exemplify military absurdity, but the abbreviation is somewhat redeemed by being fairly comprehensive.
It stands for: doctrine, organisation, training, materiel, leadership and education, personnel and facilities. Looking at the Russian military across these categories reveals why it is underperforming its potential and struggling to regenerate.
Read more analysis from Jack Watling: Russia’s underperforming military capability may be key to its downfall
Four medics have been killed and two patients injured after Russian forces fired at a psychiatric hospital in the village of Strelechya, the governor of the Kharkiv region, Oleh Syniehubov, has said.
The facility was in the process of being evacuated and medical staff were removing patients from the hospital while under heavy fire, Syniehubov said.
He added on Telegram:
.css-knbk2a{height:1em;width:1.5em;margin-right:3px;vertical-align:baseline;fill:#C70000;}During the evacuation, the Russians started a massive shelling. According to preliminary data, unfortunately, 4 medical workers died, 2 patients were injured.
The report could not be independently verified.
In case you missed it, Ukrainian authorities said on Friday they have found a mass burial site of more than 440 bodies in the eastern city of Izium that was recaptured from Russian forces.
Volodymyr Zelenskiy has likened the discovery to what had happened in Bucha, saying: “Russia leaves death everywhere, and must be responsible for it.”
Russia has repeatedly denied it targets civilians or has committed war crimes
It is 1pm in Kyiv. Here is what you might have missed:
Vladimir Putin is “failing on all of his military strategic objectives”, the chief of the defence staff has said. Adm Sir Tony Radakin said the conflict was likely to “grind on for a long time”, despite recent successes by Ukrainian military forces. Asked about the situation in Ukraine, he told the BBC’s Sunday With Laura Kuenssberg programme: “At the very outset, we said that this was a strategic error by President Putin and strategic errors lead to strategic consequences. And in this instance, it’s strategic failure. Putin is failing on all of his military strategic objectives. He wanted to subjugate Ukraine, that’s not going to happen.”
Russia has reacted to its military setbacks in the past week by increasing its missile attacks on civilian infrastructure even if they do not have any military impact, according to the latest intelligence report from the British Ministry of Defence. It says in a post on Twitter that the move is intended to destroy the morale of the Ukrainian people.
The US president, Joe Biden, urged his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, not to use tactical nuclear or chemical weapons in the wake of setbacks in Ukraine. Asked by CBS what he would say to Putin if he was considering using such weapons, Biden said: “Don’t. Don’t. Don’t. It would change the face of war unlike anything since world war two.” Biden said the US response would be “consequential”, but declined to give detail.
A total of 165 ships with 3.7 m tonnes of agricultural products onboard have left Ukraine under a deal brokered by the United Nations and Turkey to unblock Ukrainian sea ports, the Ukrainian infrastructure ministry has said. The ministry said 10 ships with 169,300 tonnes of agricultural products were due to leave Ukrainian Black Sea ports, reports Reuters.
Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and a global food crisis aggravated by the war will be the focus of world leaders when they convene at the United Nations in New York this week. “It would be naive to think that we are close to the possibility of a peace deal,” said the UN secretary general, António Guterres, before the high-level meeting of the 193-member UN general assembly, which starts on Tuesday. “The chances of a peace deal are minimal, at the present moment.”
The Czech Republic, which currently holds the EU presidency, has called for a “special international tribunal” after a mass grave was discovered in Izium, a town in north-eastern Ukraine. “In the 21st century, such attacks against the civilian population are unthinkable and abhorrent,” said Jan Lipavský, the foreign minister of the Czech Republic. Ukrainian officials have discovered more than 440 bodies, some found with their hands tied behind their backs.
Satellite imagery has emerged of the recently discovered mass grave site near Izium. The images, taken from March to August this year and released by Maxar Technologies, show the entrance to the “forest cemetery” where many bodies have been discovered.
One of the Russian-held Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant’s four main power lines has been repaired and is supplying the plant with electricity from the Ukrainian grid two weeks after it went down, the UN nuclear watchdog has said. Even though the six reactors at Zaporizhzhia, Europe’s biggest nuclear power plant, have been shut down, the plant needs electricity to keep them cool.
The Indian prime minister, Narendra Modi, told Putin on Saturday that “today’s time is not a time for war” when the pair met during a regional Asia summit in Uzbekistan. Putin told Modi he knew of India’s “concerns” about the conflict, echoing language he had used with the Chinese president, Xi Jinping, the day before. “We will do our best to end this as soon as possible,” Putin said, while accusing Kyiv of rejecting negotiations.
Speaking to reporters later, Putin vowed to continue his attack on Ukraine and warned that Moscow could ramp up its strikes on the country’s vital infrastructure if Ukrainian forces targeted facilities in Russia. Putin said the “liberation” of Ukraine’s entire eastern Donbas region remained Russia’s main military goal and that he saw no need to revise it. “We aren’t in a rush,” he said, after the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation meeting in Samarkand.
The Turkish president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, told leaders at the summit that efforts were being made “to finalise the conflict in Ukraine through diplomacy as soon as possible”. Putin told Erdoğan, who has been a key broker in limited deals between Russia and Ukraine, that Moscow was keen to build closer ties with Turkey and was ready to “significantly increase” all exports to the country.
The security service of Ukraine said Russia’s federal security service (FSU) officers tortured residents in Kupiansk, a city in Ukraine’s Kharkiv region. The Kyiv Independent reports that when FSU officers were in then occupied Kupiansk, they tortured residents and threatened to send them to minefields and kill their families.
Vladimir Putin is “failing on all of his military strategic objectives”, the chief of the defence staff has said.
Adm Sir Tony Radakin said the conflict is likely to “grind on for a long time”, despite recent successes by Ukrainian military forces.
Asked about the situation in Ukraine, he told the BBC’s Sunday With Laura Kuenssberg programme:
.css-knbk2a{height:1em;width:1.5em;margin-right:3px;vertical-align:baseline;fill:#C70000;}At the very outset, we said that this was a strategic error by President Putin and strategic errors lead to strategic consequences.
And in this instance, it’s strategic failure. Putin is failing on all of his military strategic objectives. He wanted to subjugate Ukraine, that’s not going to happen.
He wanted to take control of the capital, we saw that that was defeated earlier on. We saw that he wanted to weaken Nato. Nato is now much stronger, and we have Finland and Sweden joining.
He wants to break the international resolve. Well, actually that strengthened over this period, and he’s under pressure, his problems are mounting.
He added:
.css-knbk2a{height:1em;width:1.5em;margin-right:3px;vertical-align:baseline;fill:#C70000;}He’s always had a problem in terms of crewing the equipment that he’s got. He hasn’t got sufficient manpower. His forces are thin on the ground. And we’re also seeing a magnificent Ukrainian armed forces who have been courageous, they’re fighting for their country, and they’ve embraced the international support that all of us are providing.
"At a strategic level this is a failure for Putin"

Chief of the Defence Staff Admiral Sir Tony Radakin says Russia's problems are "mounting" in Ukraine but the "likely result is it's going to grind on for a long time"#BBCLauraK https://t.co/p2GNG2dHv6 pic.twitter.com/xvmZcojNQE
A total of 165 ships with 3.7m tonnes of agricultural products onboard have left Ukraine under a deal brokered by the United Nations and Turkey to unblock Ukrainian sea ports, the Ukrainian infrastructure ministry said today.
The ministry said 10 ships with 169,300 tonnes of agricultural products are due to leave Ukrainian Black Sea ports, reports Reuters.
The ministry said in a statement:
.css-knbk2a{height:1em;width:1.5em;margin-right:3px;vertical-align:baseline;fill:#C70000;}At 10am, eight ships left the ports of Great Odesa, and two more are waiting for their turn and favourable conditions.
Ukraine’s grain exports slumped after Russia invaded the country and blockaded its Black Sea ports, driving up global food prices and prompting fears of shortages in Africa and the Middle East.
Ukraine, a major global grain producer and exporter, shipped up to 6m tonnes of grain a month before the war.
Three Black Sea ports were reopened under an agreement signed on 22 July by Moscow and Kyiv and the ministry has said these ports are able to load and send abroad 100-150 cargo ships a month.

Reuters reports that Russian Security Council secretary Nikolai Patrushev will hold security consultations and meetings during a two-day visit to China starting Sunday, China’s foreign ministry said.
Patrushev will attend the 17th round of China’s Russia strategic security consultations and the 7th meeting of the China-Russia law enforcement security cooperation during his visit, the foreign ministry said in a statement released on its website on Sunday.
The meetings come after Chinese president Xi Jinping and his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin held face-to-face talks in Uzbekistan on Thursday, their first since the outbreak of the Ukraine war.
Our colleague Andrew Roth reports from Belgorod:
The war has become impossible to ignore in Belgorod, southern Russia, just miles from the border with Ukraine. Russian soldiers retreating from the Ukrainian counterattack now roam the streets. Air defences boom out overhead several times a day. The city is once again filled with refugees. And, at the border, Russian and Ukrainian soldiers stand within sight of each other.
Three Russian soldiers from Ossetia are wandering the unfamiliar streets past the grand Transfiguration Cathedral late one evening. They seem unsteady on their feet, perhaps drunk or tired. And they’re looking for a place to eat.
Since February, they say, they have fought in Ukraine as part of the invasion force. They were stationed in the village of Velyki Prokhody, just north of Kharkiv, when the urgent signal came to flee back to Russia last week.
Read more: ‘They won’t invade, will they?’ Fears rise in Russian city that Ukraine war could cross border
Australia will not ban Russian tourists from entering the country as part of sanctions on Russia over the war in Ukraine, defence minister Richard Marles said today.
Since the start of the conflict, Australia has sanctioned hundreds of Russian individuals and entities, Reuters reports.
It has also supplied defence equipment and humanitarian supplies to Ukraine, while outlawing exports of alumina and aluminium ores, including bauxite, to Russia.
Asked if Australia would also ban Russian tourists, Marles said sanctions were aimed at Russia’s government, “not the Russian people themselves.”
He told ABC television:
.css-knbk2a{height:1em;width:1.5em;margin-right:3px;vertical-align:baseline;fill:#C70000;}This is not something we are considering at the moment.
Marles refused to be drawn on whether Australia would provide more Bushmasters and other protected vehicles to Ukraine after a recent request from the Ukrainian ambassador to Australia.
Australia in July pledged 60 Bushmasters and 28 M113AS4 Armoured Vehicles to Ukraine.
US president Joe Biden urged Russian president Vladimir Putin not to use tactical nuclear or chemical weapons in the wake of setbacks in Ukraine, Reuters reports.
Asked by CBS what he would say to Putin if he was considering using such weapons, Biden said: “Don’t. Don’t. Don’t. It would change the face of war unlike anything since world war two.”
Biden said the US response would be “consequential,” but declined to give detail. Russia “would become more of a pariah in the world than they ever have been,” Biden said. “Depending on the extent of what they do will determine what response would occur.”
Russian government officials have dismissed Western suggestions that Moscow would use tactical nuclear weapons in Ukraine, but it remains a worry for some in the west.
And if you want to read more about this issue, our columnist Simon Tisdall has been thinking about it too:
Russia has reacted to its military setbacks in the past week by increasing its missile attacks on civilian infrastructure even if it does not have any military impact, according to the latest intelligence report from the British Ministry of Defence.
It says in a post on Twitter that the move is intended to destroy the morale of the Ukrainian people.
Latest Defence Intelligence update on the situation in Ukraine – 18 September 2022

Find out more about the UK government's response: https://t.co/NZPAVSgfAN

🇺🇦 #StandWithUkraine 🇺🇦 pic.twitter.com/j7bINlhTKp
.css-knbk2a{height:1em;width:1.5em;margin-right:3px;vertical-align:baseline;fill:#C70000;}Russia has launched several thousand long-range missiles against Ukraine since 24 February 2022. However, in the last seven days, Russia has increased its targeting of civilian infrastructure even where it probably perceives no immediate military effect.
This category of mission has included strikes against the electricity grid, and a dam on the Inhulets River at Kryvyi Rih.
As it faces setbacks on the front lines, Russia has likely extended the locations it is prepared to strike in an attempt to directly undermine the morale of the Ukrainian people and government.
Welcome to our live coverage of the war in Ukraine. I’m Martin Farrer and I’ll be with you for the next hour or so.
The main developments you need to know about are here:
US president Joe Biden urged Russian president Vladimir Putin to not use tactical nuclear or chemical weapons in the wake of setbacks in Ukraine. Asked by CBS what he would say to Putin if he was considering using such weapons, Biden said: “Don’t. Don’t. Don’t. It would change the face of war unlike anything since world war two.” Biden said the US response would be “consequential,” but declined to give detail.
Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and a global food crisis aggravated by the war will be the focus of world leaders when they convene at the United Nations in New York this week. “It would be naive to think that we are close to the possibility of a peace deal,” said UN secretary-general Antonio Guterres ahead of the high-level meeting of the 193-member UN general assembly, which starts on Tuesday. “The chances of a peace deal are minimal, at the present moment.”
The Czech Republic, which currently holds the EU presidency, have called for a “special international tribunal” after a mass grave was discovered in Izium, a town in north-eastern Ukraine. “In the 21st century, such attacks against the civilian population are unthinkable and abhorrent,” said Jan Lipavský, foreign minister of the Czech Republic. More than 440 bodies have been discovered by Ukrainian officials, with some found with their hands tied behind their backs.
Satellite imagery has emerged of the recently discovered mass grave site near Izium. The images, taken from March to August this year and released by Maxar Technologies, show the entrance to the “forest cemetery” where many bodies have been discovered.
One of the Russian-held Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant’s four main power lines has been repaired and is supplying the plant with electricity from the Ukrainian grid two weeks after it went down, the UN nuclear watchdog has said. Even though the six reactors at Zaporizhzhia, Europe’s biggest nuclear power plant, have been shut down, the plant needs electricity to keep them cool.

Indian prime minister Narendra Modi told Putin on Saturday that “today’s time is not a time for war” when the pair met during a regional Asia summit in Uzbekistan. Putin told Modi he knew of India’s “concerns” about the conflict, echoing language he had used with Chinese president Xi Jinping the day before. “We will do our best to end this as soon as possible,” Putin said, while accusing Kyiv of rejecting negotiations.
Speaking to reporters later, Putin vowed to continue his attack on Ukraine and warned that Moscow could ramp up its strikes on the country’s vital infrastructure if Ukrainian forces target facilities in Russia. Putin said the “liberation” of Ukraine’s entire eastern Donbas region remained Russia’s main military goal and that he saw no need to revise it. “We aren’t in a rush,” he said after the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation meeting in Samarkand.
Turkish president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, told leaders at the summit that efforts were being made “to finalise the conflict in Ukraine through diplomacy as soon as possible”. Putin told Erdogan, who has been a key broker in limited deals between Russia and Ukraine, that Moscow was keen to build closer ties with Turkey and was ready to “significantly increase” all exports to the country.
The security service of Ukraine said that Russia’s federal security service (FSU) officers tortured residents in Kupiansk, a city in Ukraine’s Kharkiv region. The Kyiv Independent reports that when FSU officers were in then-occupied Kupiansk, they tortured residents and threatened to send them to minefields and kill their families.

source

Exit mobile version