Home Latest Hubble Space Telescope Observations Used To Answer Key Exoplanet Questions – SciTechDaily

Hubble Space Telescope Observations Used To Answer Key Exoplanet Questions – SciTechDaily

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Hubble Exoplanets 25 Hot Jupiters

Hubble Space Telescope archival observations of 25 hot Jupiters have been analyzed by an international team of astronomers, enabling them to answer five open questions important to our understanding of exoplanet atmospheres. Amongst other findings, the team found that the presence of metal oxides and hydrides in the hottest exoplanet atmospheres was clearly correlated with the atmospheres’ being thermally inverted. Credit: ESA/Hubble, N. Bartmann; CC BY 4.0

A worldwide team of astronomers studied archival <span class=glossaryLink aria-describedby=tt data-cmtooltip="

Hubble Space Telescope
The Hubble Space Telescope (often referred to as Hubble or HST) is one of NASA's Great Observatories and was launched into low Earth orbit in 1990. It is one of the largest and most versatile space telescopes in use and features a 2.4-meter mirror and four main instruments that observe in the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. It was named after astronomer Edwin Hubble.

” data-gt-translate-attributes='[{“attribute”:”data-cmtooltip”, “format”:”html”}]’>Hubble Space Telescope observations of 25 hot Jupiters, allowing them to answer five unresolved questions important to our understanding of exoplanet atmospheres. The researchers discovered, among other things, that the existence of metal oxides and hydrides in the hottest <span class=glossaryLink aria-describedby=tt data-cmtooltip="

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exoplanet
An exoplanet (or extrasolar planet) is a planet that is outside the Solar System, orbiting around a star other than the Sun. The first suspected scientific detection of an exoplanet occurred in 1988, with the first confirmation of detection coming in 1992.

” data-gt-translate-attributes='[{“attribute”:”data-cmtooltip”, “format”:”html”}]’>exoplanet atmospheres was clearly connected with the atmospheres being thermally inverted.

The field of exoplanet science has long since shifted its focus from just detection to characterization, although characterization remains extremely challenging. Thus far, the majority of research on characterization has been focused on modeling or studies of one or a few exoplanets. This new research study, led by researchers based at University College London (UCL), used the most archival data ever examined in a single exoplanet atmospheric survey to assess the atmospheres of 25 exoplanets. The majority of the data came from observations made with the <span class=glossaryLink aria-describedby=tt data-cmtooltip="

NASA
Established in 1958, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an independent agency of the United States Federal Government that succeeded the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). It is responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and aerospace research. It's vision is &quot;To discover and expand knowledge for the benefit of humanity.&quot;

” data-gt-translate-attributes='[{“attribute”:”data-cmtooltip”, “format”:”html”}]’>NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

Hot Jupiters are a class of gas giant exoplanets that are inferred to be physically similar to <span class=glossaryLink aria-describedby=tt data-cmtooltip="

Jupiter
Jupiter is the largest planet in the solar system and the fifth planet from the sun. It is a gas giant with a mass greater then all of the other planets combined. Its name comes from the Roman god Jupiter.

” data-gt-translate-attributes='[{“attribute”:”data-cmtooltip”, “format”:”html”}]’>Jupiter but that have very short orbital periods (P < 10 days). Because of their close proximity to their stars and high surface-atmosphere temperatures, they are colloquially known as “hot Jupiters.”

try{window._mNHandle.queue.push(function(){window._mNDetails.loadTag(“974871025″,”600×250″,”974871025”);});}
catch(error){}

The lead author, Quentin Changeat, explains: “Hubble enabled the in-depth characterization of 25 exoplanets, and the amount of information we learned about their chemistry and formation — thanks to a decade of intense observing campaigns — is incredible.”

The science team sought to find answers to five open questions about exoplanet atmospheres — an ambitious goal that they succeeded in reaching. Their questions probed what H– and certain metals can tell us about the chemistry and circulation of exoplanet atmospheres, and about planet formation. They chose to investigate a wide range of hot Jupiters, with the intention of identifying trends within their sample population that might provide insight into exoplanet atmospheres more generally.

The study’s co-leader, Billy Edwards of UCL and the Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (CEA) said: “Our paper marks a turning point for the field: we are now moving from the characterization of individual exoplanet atmospheres to the characterization of atmospheric populations.”

In order to investigate their sample of 25 exoplanets, the team reanalyzed an enormous amount of archival data, consisting of 600 hours of Hubble observations, which they complemented with more than 400 hours of observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope. Their data contained eclipses for all 25 exoplanets, and transits for 17 of them. An eclipse occurs when an exoplanet passes behind its star as seen from Earth, and a transit occurs when a planet passes in front of its star. Eclipse and transit data can both provide crucial information about an exoplanet’s atmosphere.

The large-scale survey yielded results, with the team able to identify some clear trends and correlations between the exoplanets’ atmospheric constitutions and observed behavior. Some of their key findings related to the presence or absence of thermal inversions in the atmospheres of their exoplanet sample. They found that almost all the exoplanets with a thermally inverted atmosphere were extremely hot, with temperatures over 2000 Kelvins. Importantly, this is sufficiently hot that the metallic species TiO (titanium oxide), VO (vanadium oxide), and FeH (iron hydride) are stable in an atmosphere. Of the exoplanets displaying thermal inversions, almost all of them were found to have H–, TiO, VO, or FeH in their atmospheres.

It is always challenging to draw inferences from such results because correlation does not necessarily equal causation. However, the team was able to propose a compelling argument for why the presence of H–, TiO, VO, or FeH might lead to a thermal inversion — namely that all these metallic species are very efficient absorbers of stellar light. It might be that exoplanet atmospheres hot enough to sustain these species tend to be thermally inverted because they then absorb so much stellar light that their upper atmospheres heat up even more. Conversely, the team also found that colder hot Jupiters (with temperatures less than 2000 Kelvins, and thus without H–, TiO, VO or FeH in their atmospheres) almost never had thermally inverted atmospheres.

A significant aspect of this research was that the team was able to use a large sample of exoplanets and an extremely large amount of data to determine trends, which can be used to predict behavior in other exoplanets. This is extremely useful, because it provides insight into how planets may form, and also because it allows other astronomers to more effectively plan future observations. Conversely, if a paper studies a single exoplanet in great detail, whilst that is valuable it is much harder to extrapolate trends from. An improved understanding of exoplanet populations could also bring us closer to solving open mysteries about our own Solar System.

As Changeat says: “Many issues such as the origins of the water on Earth, the formation of the Moon, and the different evolutionary histories of Earth and <span class=glossaryLink aria-describedby=tt data-cmtooltip="

Mars
Mars is the second smallest planet in our solar system and the fourth planet from the sun. Iron oxide is prevalent in Mars' surface resulting in its reddish color and its nickname &quot;The Red Planet.&quot; Mars' name comes from the Roman god of war.

” data-gt-translate-attributes='[{“attribute”:”data-cmtooltip”, “format”:”html”}]’>Mars, are still unsolved despite our ability to obtain in-situ measurements. Large exoplanet population studies, such as the one we present here, aim at understanding those general processes.”

Hubble Space Telescope archival observations of 25 hot Jupiters have been analyzed by an international team of astronomers, enabling them to answer five open questions important to our understanding of exoplanet atmospheres. Amongst other findings, the team found that the presence of metal oxides and hydrides in the hottest exoplanet atmospheres was clearly correlated with the atmospheres’ being thermally inverted. Credit: ESA/Hubble, N. Bartmann; CC BY 4.0
A worldwide team of astronomers studied archival <span class=glossaryLink aria-describedby=tt data-cmtooltip="

Hubble Space Telescope
The Hubble Space Telescope (often referred to as Hubble or HST) is one of NASA's Great Observatories and was launched into low Earth orbit in 1990. It is one of the largest and most versatile space telescopes in use and features a 2.4-meter mirror and four main instruments that observe in the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. It was named after astronomer Edwin Hubble.

” data-gt-translate-attributes='[{“attribute”:”data-cmtooltip”, “format”:”html”}]’>Hubble Space Telescope observations of 25 hot Jupiters, allowing them to answer five unresolved questions important to our understanding of exoplanet atmospheres. The researchers discovered, among other things, that the existence of metal oxides and hydrides in the hottest <span class=glossaryLink aria-describedby=tt data-cmtooltip="

exoplanet
An exoplanet (or extrasolar planet) is a planet that is outside the Solar System, orbiting around a star other than the Sun. The first suspected scientific detection of an exoplanet occurred in 1988, with the first confirmation of detection coming in 1992.

” data-gt-translate-attributes='[{“attribute”:”data-cmtooltip”, “format”:”html”}]’>exoplanet atmospheres was clearly connected with the atmospheres being thermally inverted.
The field of exoplanet science has long since shifted its focus from just detection to characterization, although characterization remains extremely challenging. Thus far, the majority of research on characterization has been focused on modeling or studies of one or a few exoplanets. This new research study, led by researchers based at University College London (UCL), used the most archival data ever examined in a single exoplanet atmospheric survey to assess the atmospheres of 25 exoplanets. The majority of the data came from observations made with the <span class=glossaryLink aria-describedby=tt data-cmtooltip="

NASA
Established in 1958, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an independent agency of the United States Federal Government that succeeded the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). It is responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and aerospace research. It's vision is &quot;To discover and expand knowledge for the benefit of humanity.&quot;

” data-gt-translate-attributes='[{“attribute”:”data-cmtooltip”, “format”:”html”}]’>NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.
Hot Jupiters are a class of gas giant exoplanets that are inferred to be physically similar to <span class=glossaryLink aria-describedby=tt data-cmtooltip="

Jupiter
Jupiter is the largest planet in the solar system and the fifth planet from the sun. It is a gas giant with a mass greater then all of the other planets combined. Its name comes from the Roman god Jupiter.

” data-gt-translate-attributes='[{“attribute”:”data-cmtooltip”, “format”:”html”}]’>Jupiter but that have very short orbital periods (P < 10 days). Because of their close proximity to their stars and high surface-atmosphere temperatures, they are colloquially known as “hot Jupiters.”

try{window._mNHandle.queue.push(function(){window._mNDetails.loadTag(“974871025″,”600×250″,”974871025”);});}
catch(error){}

The lead author, Quentin Changeat, explains: “Hubble enabled the in-depth characterization of 25 exoplanets, and the amount of information we learned about their chemistry and formation — thanks to a decade of intense observing campaigns — is incredible.”
The science team sought to find answers to five open questions about exoplanet atmospheres — an ambitious goal that they succeeded in reaching. Their questions probed what H– and certain metals can tell us about the chemistry and circulation of exoplanet atmospheres, and about planet formation. They chose to investigate a wide range of hot Jupiters, with the intention of identifying trends within their sample population that might provide insight into exoplanet atmospheres more generally.
The study’s co-leader, Billy Edwards of UCL and the Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (CEA) said: “Our paper marks a turning point for the field: we are now moving from the characterization of individual exoplanet atmospheres to the characterization of atmospheric populations.”
In order to investigate their sample of 25 exoplanets, the team reanalyzed an enormous amount of archival data, consisting of 600 hours of Hubble observations, which they complemented with more than 400 hours of observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope. Their data contained eclipses for all 25 exoplanets, and transits for 17 of them. An eclipse occurs when an exoplanet passes behind its star as seen from Earth, and a transit occurs when a planet passes in front of its star. Eclipse and transit data can both provide crucial information about an exoplanet’s atmosphere.
The large-scale survey yielded results, with the team able to identify some clear trends and correlations between the exoplanets’ atmospheric constitutions and observed behavior. Some of their key findings related to the presence or absence of thermal inversions in the atmospheres of their exoplanet sample. They found that almost all the exoplanets with a thermally inverted atmosphere were extremely hot, with temperatures over 2000 Kelvins. Importantly, this is sufficiently hot that the metallic species TiO (titanium oxide), VO (vanadium oxide), and FeH (iron hydride) are stable in an atmosphere. Of the exoplanets displaying thermal inversions, almost all of them were found to have H–, TiO, VO, or FeH in their atmospheres.
It is always challenging to draw inferences from such results because correlation does not necessarily equal causation. However, the team was able to propose a compelling argument for why the presence of H–, TiO, VO, or FeH might lead to a thermal inversion — namely that all these metallic species are very efficient absorbers of stellar light. It might be that exoplanet atmospheres hot enough to sustain these species tend to be thermally inverted because they then absorb so much stellar light that their upper atmospheres heat up even more. Conversely, the team also found that colder hot Jupiters (with temperatures less than 2000 Kelvins, and thus without H–, TiO, VO or FeH in their atmospheres) almost never had thermally inverted atmospheres.
A significant aspect of this research was that the team was able to use a large sample of exoplanets and an extremely large amount of data to determine trends, which can be used to predict behavior in other exoplanets. This is extremely useful, because it provides insight into how planets may form, and also because it allows other astronomers to more effectively plan future observations. Conversely, if a paper studies a single exoplanet in great detail, whilst that is valuable it is much harder to extrapolate trends from. An improved understanding of exoplanet populations could also bring us closer to solving open mysteries about our own Solar System.
As Changeat says: “Many issues such as the origins of the water on Earth, the formation of the Moon, and the different evolutionary histories of Earth and <span class=glossaryLink aria-describedby=tt data-cmtooltip="

Mars
Mars is the second smallest planet in our solar system and the fourth planet from the sun. Iron oxide is prevalent in Mars' surface resulting in its reddish color and its nickname &quot;The Red Planet.&quot; Mars' name comes from the Roman god of war.

” data-gt-translate-attributes='[{“attribute”:”data-cmtooltip”, “format”:”html”}]’>Mars, are still unsolved despite our ability to obtain in-situ measurements. Large exoplanet population studies, such as the one we present here, aim at understanding those general processes.”

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Sanjeev Ramachandran has found ultimate joy all through his 23-year-long journalism career by writing for national and international newspapers, websites and blogs. From technology to politics to sports to entertainment, he has been able to express ideas and pen opinion pieces on whatever triggers his interest. Currently at the helm of his own content and public relations company, called Siyahi – The Content & PR People, he makes sure that he doesn’t always let administrative tasks take over his writing space.