Hawaii is not a place that is known for its share of tropical cyclones, but this year, Hawaiians have two to look forward to – within the same week, perhaps. Hurricanes Iselle and Julio are both in the Pacific Ocean currently, with similar storm paths that will place both in the vicinity of the Hawaiian islands over the next seven days.

Iselle is expected to hit the Hawaiian islands on Thursday night, and Hawaii could see the more massive Julio hit sometime over the weekend or early next week. Iselle is located at 17 degrees north, 144.5 degrees west, with 85mph winds and wind gusts up to 105mph. The storm is moving west-northwest at 15mph. Meteorologists are saying that Iselle and Julio will both be downgraded tropical storms when they arrive in the Hawaiian island vicinity due to a mass of dry air that is expected to collide with these storms over the next hours.

The tropical cyclone Iselle is expected to bring the wind to Hilo, which will create clouds that will then rain for days – causing massive amounts of flooding. Meteorologists say that, as Iselle will bring massive rain as she hits the Hawaiian islands up the mountain; as she progresses up the mountain, she will then bring massive flooding on the lower parts of the mountain. Massive flooding can occur with Iselle.

Iselle, however, may actually weaken Julio’s impact, if she stays in the water and spins for some time. By spinning in the water, Iselle would limit the amount of warm water to which Julio would have access. When storms hit the water, and temperatures are warm, storms can often grow before they strike land. Even if a storm strikes land and dies some, it can still regenerate if it hits warm water again before moving on to a different territory.

Sadly, Julio will not have to do much, even if he does not possess the same strength as he did before.

To the citizens of Hawaii, you are in our thoughts and prayers with the hard days ahead you have to face. It is our hope that you remain safe in the presence of others who will be there to help you through what can be expected. Even now, we pray that these storms will pass you by.